Festive Foliage Dangers for our Fur-Friends


PDSA warns pet owners about toxic winter plants

As we head into the festive season, homes often become showered in decorations, with many decking the halls with seasonal favourites, from Holly to Mistletoe. Whilst they may make a house beautiful, they can pose hazards to your pets – so remember to keep them out of paws’ reach!

Vets from PDSA – the UK’s largest veterinary charity – have issued some advice on which seasonal favourites to avoid, from Ivy, Snowdrops and Poinsettia to everyone’s favourite for a Christmas kiss, Mistletoe.

PDSA Veterinary Surgeon Lynne James said:

“Many pet owners aren’t aware that quite a few festive favourite plants are toxic to animals and whilst they make for great decorations, they should all be kept well out of reach of our four-legged friends. For pet owners who want to spread some festive cheer and decorate, I’d recommend keeping these plants out of the house and garden, and well out of the reach of prying paws.”

There are several other winter wonders to steer clear from, with some plants still growing indoors as well as outdoors during the wintery months.

Plants to avoid this festive season:

  • Azalea/Rhododendron (Rhododendron species): Also present in summer, autumn and winter.
  • Amaryllis (Hippeastrum species): Also present in autumn.
  • Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster species): Also present in summer, autumn and winter.
  • Heavenly bamboo (Nandina domestica): Also present in summer, autumn and winter.
  • Holly (Ilex species): Take care to avoid berries in the winter. Also present in summer, autumn and winter.
  • Horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum): Also present in summer, autumn and winter.
  • Ivy (Hedera species): Also present in summer, autumn and winter.
  • Laurel (including Cherry Laurel (Prunus laurocerasus) and other laurel species): Also present in spring, summer and autumn.
  • Mistletoe (Viscum album): Take care to avoid berries in the winter. Also present in summer, autumn and winter.
  • Oak (Quercus pedunculata): Also present in summer, autumn and winter.
  • Poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima)
  • Rowan (Sorbus aucuparia): Also present in summer, autumn and winter.
  • Snowdrops (Galanthus): Also present in spring.
  • Yew (Taxus baccata and related species): Also present in summer, autumn and winter.

Christmas is supposed to be a fun-filled time for all of the family, so to ensure your fur-friends stay safe and happy, avoid the festive foliage. Signs of poisoning can include sickness, diarrhoea, drooling, abdominal pain, shaking and breathing problems. If you suspect your pet has eaten something poisonous, contact your vet for advice immediately.

For more advice, check out PDSA’s Poisons and Hazards Guide





Source link

You May Also Like

About the Author: Tony Ramos

Home Privacy Policy Terms Of Use Anti Spam Policy Contact Us Affiliate Disclosure Amazon Affiliate Disclaimer DMCA Earnings Disclaimer